20

http://en.wikisource.org

"Hello, finally. This is an unusual talk in which I'm going to start by explaining the ideas of free software, and then go on to talk about how they extend to some things other than software. People have been taught mostly when judging what software to use, to judge it superficially in terms of practical convenience only, how powerful is it, how efficient is it, how convenient is it, how reliable is it, what is its cost, pure matters of practical usefulness. Well, of course they count for something, but if that's all you think about you're overlooking the most important thing, which is: how does it treat your freedom and your community, the ethical aspects of using a particular program. People are not taught to even to pay attention to them, or even that they exist. And that's what the Free Software Movement is all about [...] But in order for people to defend their freedom, they have to value it, and in order to value their freedom they have to know what it means. In other areas of life, people have been discussing the ideas of human rights for centuries. There has been long time of debate for what human rights should be, and a long time to spread these ideas around the World. But that does not mean that we always succeed in defending them. But at least we have a base with which to try. But computing is a new area of life, only about, it's only about 15 years, even in the riches countries, that most people participate in computing. So that's not much time for most people to debate about what human rights should be for the users of software, and to the extend that there has been any discussion of that question, it has mostly been under the domination of the large companies that develop proprietary software..."

Full story »
can.axis's picture
Created by can.axis 6 years 18 weeks ago – Made popular 6 years 18 weeks ago
Category: Philosophy   Tags: