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http://andrewfenn.blogspot.com

There's always numerous suggestions by different members of the Linux community on how to encourage mainstream commerical game developers to make games for the platform. Andrew Flenn asked EA why they ignore Linux as a platform.

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qubodup's picture
Created by qubodup 5 years 42 weeks ago – Made popular 5 years 42 weeks ago
Category: Industry   Tags:
aboutblank's picture

aboutblank

5 years 42 weeks 15 min 11 sec ago

6

You should value your freedom

This is exactly the sort of thing we warn about when we say that users give up their freedom whenever users accept proprietary software. Electronic Arts do not respect their users' freedom and now, they baulk about not being able to cater to every different requirement!

You choose to give up your right to freedom whenever you accept proprietary software. Without the right to freedom 1, you choose to be helpless and dependant as a subject under the master; the master in this case is Electronic Arts (EA). The masters over proprietary software expect their users to be helpless and divided and this is exactly what is happening here! Now that you have a different requirement (change the game to run on your GNU/Linux system), you are completely dependant upon the master's goodwill; i.e. you are helpless to help yourself because you must first ask permission.

Had this been free software, you would have the right to improve the game to work to your specific requirements; you would have the implied right to tinker. Please, don't forget that one doesn't need to be a programmer to tinker with software. All you really need to do is find a programmer that is willing to help you. Sometimes, this might mean that you'll have to hire a programmer to help.

motters's picture

motters

5 years 42 weeks 3 hours 26 min ago

0

Just say no to disableware

EA has a truly appalling track record with regard to use of digital restrictions in its games. We do not want them bringing DRM, or anything like it, to the Linux platform.